Lime and Ginger Seville Orange Marmalade Recipe

Seville Oranges are only in season for a few weeks in January. This year, try your hand at making your own Seville Orange Marmalade and we promise it will be worth the effort, because you simply can't beat homemade marmalade. And why not flavour it with lime and ginger ? You really do need to buy them Organic, as you will be eating the peel. Note on sugar : Most traditional recipes call for a 1:2 ratio of Seville oranges to sugar. But that produces a fairly sweet marmalade. We find that a 1:1 ratio of oranges to sugar, the same ratio as for jam, is enough to preserve the marmalade, and produces enough sweetness, providing you enjoy the slight bitterness, and you are cutting the sugar content by half ! But if you prefer a sweeter marmalade, please feel free to use a 1:1,5 or even the traditional 1:2 fruit to sugar ratio.

Posted by: michael
On:

Cuisine

British

Time

> 2 hrs

Skill Level

Confident

Serves

24

Courses etc.

Breakfast

You will need

IngredientAdd
about 1 Kg organic Seville oranges

Temporarily unavailable due to high coronavirus demand

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1 Kg Demerara sugar

Limited availability due to high coronavirus demand

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2 limes, juiced (about 75 ml) OR
1 large organic lemon, juiced (about 75 ml) More products
a 2 inch (about 5 cm) piece of fresh ginger root, washed then grated then pressed through a fine sieve to collect the juice (no need to peel the ginger first) More products

Need help converting measurements? View our recipe measurement conversion tables here.

Method

  • Start by washing the Seville oranges. Scrub them with a vegetable brush if they are covered in any residue, and remove the buttons at the top of the fruits. Slice them in half, ready for juicing. Juice all the oranges using a citrus juicer, then reserve the juice, and collect the seeds into a nut milk bag or a bag made of cheese cloth tied with some string.
  • Using a very sharp knife, slice the orange peels thin, medium or chunky, according to how you like your marmalade. Put the sliced peel, orange juice, orange seed bag and water into a large bowl to soak overnight.
  • When you are ready to cook the marmalade, transfer the soaked mixture to a preserving pan if you have one, or large saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer gently for about 2 hours, until the peel is perfectly soft about half the water has evaporated. Once you have added the sugar in the next step, the peel will not soften any further, so you want to make sure you cook the mixture long enough. Remove the seed bag, pressing it with the back of a wooden spoon to extract as much pectin-rich juices as possible.
  • Add in the lemon or lime juice, the ginger juice and the sugar. Stir over medium heat until all the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil again, stirring gently until you reach setting point, about 20 to 25 minutes. You can use a jam making thermometer or use the plate test : place a small saucer in the fridge when you start cooking the marmalade. When you are ready to test the marmalade, retrieve the saucer from the fridge, drop a small amount of the mixture on and allow to cool for about 2 minutes. The marmalade has set when if you push it with your fingers wrinkles appear onto the surface of the cooled puddle. If the marmalade has not set, cook for a further 5 minutes and repeat the test.
  • Once the marmalade has set, remove the saucepan from the heat. Leave to cool for 5 to 10 minutes, then pour into clean jars. Close your jars, label them and let them cool fully to create the seal.

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Shopping List

Seville Orange ORGANIC
Sinature
Temporarily unavailable due to high coronavirus demand
Lemon ORGANIC
Real Foods (each)
£0.80
Fresh Ginger ORGANIC
Real Foods
Raw Cane Demerara Sugar
Real Foods
Limited availability due to high coronavirus demand